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Scotland grants planning consent for 12MW Dounreay Tri floating wind farm

EBR Staff Writer Published 20 March 2017

The Scottish government has granted planning consent for the 12MW Dounreay Tri floating wind farm demonstrator project off the Caithness coast.

Located about 9km off Dounreay, the project is being developed by Swedish engineering company Hexicon. It is planned to be commissioned in June 2018.

Featuring two turbines, the project aims to demonstrate Hexicon's semi-submersible foundation for offshore wind power.

Scottish Minister for Business, Innovation and Energy, Paul Wheelhouse said: “Once operational, this demonstrator project will help to develop this pioneering technology and cement Scotland’s reputation at the forefront of innovation in the renewables sector.”

Wheelhouse noted that the latest consent for project increases the Scottish Government’s approved floating offshore wind capacity to 92MW, which is enough to power almost 60,000 homes.

“The Scottish Government’s commitment to supporting low carbon energy is outlined in our draft Energy Strategy which sets out next steps and how we will continue to transition to a low carbon economy, with the offshore wind sector – developed with due regard to our natural environment - playing an increasingly influential role.”

The Dounreay project is expected to generate clean electricity required to power almost 8,000 homes. It will also help in creating 100 jobs during assembly, installation and through ongoing operations and maintenance activities.

The project comprises a semi-submersible platform fitted with two wind turbines, each with 5MW capacity, as well as mooring lines or chains, and drag-embedment anchors.

Recently, the Scottish government approved the Kincardine floating offshore wind farm followed by consent of the Hywind Scotland Pilot in 2016.